ACO-ACE-UAP-UFO Clubs

TJ Morris dba ACIR, Agent-Consultant-Organizer- Founder-Director

In order to form a more perfect union establish this Constitution with Articles and By-laws to meet the standards of incorporation in the United States of America. We abide by all laws and uphold the constitution of the United States of America. We consider ourselves in a cooperative as a CO-OP and are independent business associations and members of our organizations as support and fellowship groups as one whole community online practicing skills.
Theresa J Morris is the agent for both the ACO and ACE.
We share ERA COP as our Files for major decisions on our agreements while forming our future in the present online. We share that we are authors, consultants, organizers, and share in radio shows to share our communication and speechcraft. We are co-creators and work to share our opinions, views, and ideas we use in synchronicity.
 Ascension Center Organization for Cyberspace Cultural Community who believe Alien Civilizations Exist! Archivists and Researchers who share as AUTHORS, Storytellers, and Role Playing with games both live and in archetypes based on the tarot. Past, present, and future role models. We are members and mentors who share life in cyberpsace and have an annual convention meet up group at the Mid-South Con in Memphis, Tennessee. We are based on the fact that “Alien Civilizations Exist!: ACE.
We share the ACE Metaphysical Institute for metaphysicians.- 

2016 – In March – April- May we extended our events to include the 1st International Science Global Pyramid Conference with Rev. Marta Thomas of Chicago, Illinois. We agreed to have her on our CosmosRadioOrg Radio Show and to promote all her choices for speakers at this annual event which promotes the “Pyramid Family Gathering of Researchers.” Bruce Cunningham, Marta Thomas, Radmilo Anicic, Dr. Robert J. Gilbert, and others were accepted as speakers.

Officers for the next three years were decided after the passing of our former President Thomas R. Morris on Dec. 2, 2015. He was the grandson of John Crystal Morris who lived to be a Kentucky Colonel at the age of 108 years and 9 months before his passing. Ascension Center Church Org was added as a name and website in honor of keeping the spirit alive of the “Christ Consciousness” of Ascension.

Spiritual and Education Awareness is still the main mission for our Ascension Center Education (ACE) and spreading the word that Alien Civilizations Exist (ACE) and Adults Continuing Education.

ACO is the acronym for Ascension Center Organization and Alien Contact Org. The Cooperative is of volunteers as Lightworkers and Truhseekers. The main Ascension Center Articles and By-laws was accepted in 1993 and adopted again in 2012 with the TJ Morris ET Radio Shows on http://blogttalkradio.com/TJMorrisETRadio and also known as http://blogtalkradio.com/CosmosRadioOrg.

Officers: voted 
ACO MAGAZINEevery 3 years.
Board of Directors:
Theresa J Morris
Janet Kira Lessin
Thomas Anthony Sinisi
Bill M. Tracer
Thomas Becker
Dr. Bruce Maccabee, Phd. Board of Advisers
Dr. Alexander (Sasha)  Philip Lessin, Ph.d. Board of Advisers
Dr. Robert J. Gilbert, Board of Advisers
Radmilo Anicic – Canada-New York

Alien Contact Org (ACO)~ Alien Cosmos Expos (ACE) ~ A Peer-Review-Journal~ ACO UFO CLUB~ TJ Morris ACIR
ACO CLUB – JOIN TODAY!
DONATE-SUPPORT HERE!
ALIEN COSMOS EXPOS USA
MEMBERS POSITIONS
PAYPAL ME TO HELP
TJ MORRIS RADIO MAG
THERESA J MORRIS, FOUNDER
TJ MORRIS ACIR
TJ MORRIS ET COSMOS RADIO
COSMOS RADIO ORG
ASCENSION PSYCHICS

Since World War I We began Keeping = 20 year increments as generations from birth until Age 20 Since adults begin legal age as 21 accepted after junior college or 2 years as skills minimum paid for.

Education for our generations in the world. We would like to continue our trade and commerce/
Information and Artificial Intelligence is here to stay.
Aerospace Advancements for our future deals with 2025-2044 –
We share 2025 as future of humankind.

2 years – Associates Junior College by Age 21 years is planned.

We now recognize that the latter generations may not plan on higher education for Bachelors however, for those that do plan on receiving a masters and doctor in philosophy this will require masters and doctors education in metaphysics.

1 ended 1918(World War I Generation) – 1903-1923
Greatest Generation – World War II-1924-1945(WWI Ended 1918)
Baby Boomer Generation – 1946- 1964
Generation X – 1965 -1984
Generation Y (Millenials) – 1985-2004
Generation (Information Age) 2005-2024
Alpha Generation (Singularity Intelligence) 2025-2044
Bravo Generation(Bravo -Class 1 Planet Space Age) 2045-2064
For more information:

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2014/03/here-is-when-each-generation-begins-and-ends-according-to-facts/359589/

“All this data exhaust inherently generates privacy concerns and the need for protecting that data,” says Maguire, adding that she’s buoyed by the progress being made on a variety of fronts to protect personal data. “We must have ownership and oversight of our data.”
The third big shift being made by the information generation – those growing up in the era of Internet ubiquity – is in the arena of augmented decision making.
“Tech leaders increasingly are saying that we’re moving to a world where employees with smart decision-support systems in the workplace,” says Maguire, citing the example of a doctor pulling from reams of research at the click of a mouse. “We’re not talking about job displacement by AI (artificial intelligence) robots. We’re talking about having workplace tools that let us do our jobs better.”
Examples of this approach include Hong Kong’s efficient subway system, which uses AI systems to run simulated train lines to determine the best possible timetable while saving the company nearly $1 million a year, she says.
The fourth coming shift is dubbed “multi-sensory communication,” and is perhaps best exemplified by one feature of Apple Watch. Using a built-in tech that can tap its user on the wrist with a burst of energy, Watch is capable of relaying wearers’ heartbeats from watch to watch. Maguire calls this just the tip of an iceberg of tech innovations whose mission is to save us from information overload.
“The next decade will find us receiving information in new ways, using new senses,” she says, citing Marriott Hotels’ Teleporter, a roving device that allows visitors to be whisked away to properties around the world thanks to the magic of Facebook-owned Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles.

USA TODAY
Experts: Wearable tech tests our privacy limits
“Some of this stuff might be clunky now, but early indications are that these breakthrough will become less contrived and more organic,” she says. “Soon we simply won’t be just taking things in through screens.”
The last shift circles back to the first. Under the heading “privacy-enhancing tech” are predictions of cryptographic breakthroughs that hopefully will deliver us from a reality where it seems every major outfit is being hacked on an almost daily basis.
Of all the shifts, however, this one clearly deserves the most attention. Without encrypted and secure data transfer, our digital lives will fast become an open book.
Says Maguire: “The question we need to keep asking is, simply, what is technology setting us up for over the longer term?”
To read more:http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/04/16/2025-tech-predictions-thrilling-and-scary-data-ubiquity-security-concerns/25740105/

PHILIP BUMP Wired
 MAR 25, 2014 
 U.S.
We can all agree that Millennials are the worst. But what is a Millennial? A fight between The New York Times and Slate inspired us to try and figure that out.
After the Times ran a column giving employers tips on how to deal with Millennials (for example, they need regular naps) (I didn’t read the article; that’s from my experience), Slate’s Amanda Hess pointed out that the examples theTimes used to demonstrate their points weren’t actually Millennials. Some of the people quoted in the article were as old as 37, which was considered elderly only 5,000 short years ago. I started by calling the Census Bureau. A representative called me back, without much information. “We do not define the different generations,” she told me. “The only generation we do define is Baby Boomers and that year bracket is from 1946 to 1964.”
Next, I spoke with Tom DiPrete, a sociology professor at Columbia University. And he agreed with the Census Bureau. “I think the boundaries end up getting drawn to some extent by the media,” DiPrete said, “and the extent to which people accept them or not varies by the generation.” DiPrete explained that there was a good sociological reason for identifying the Baby Boom as a discrete generation. It “had specific characteristics,” and occurred within an observable timeframe. World War II ended. You had the post-war rise in standard of living and the rise of the nuclear family. Then societal changes disrupted those patterns, and the generation, for academic purposes, was over. His main point: “History isn’t always so punctuated.”
I understood why Generation X, a generation defined by turmoil and uncertainty, would be poorly defined. But what about Millennials? Doesn’t their shared experience of the millennium transition and technology provide similar markers? “I actually haven’t seen efforts to document [generations] rigorously, and I would be somewhat skeptical that they can be documented rigorously.” DiPrete said. The things that have shaped Millennials — the rise of technology and social networks, for example — “affect people’s lives differently.”
“The media in particular wants definitions, identities,” DiPrete said. “I don’t know that the definitions are as strong or as widely shared across all the boundaries. … At the end I think it gets fuzzy.”
Well, yeah. We do want definitions. And if it’s the media that draws the boundaries, then allow us to do so definitively.
Your official demarcation of generational boundaries
We identified six different generations, and labeled their eras.
Greatest Generation. These are the people that fought and died in World War II for our freedom, which we appreciate. But it’s a little over-the-top as far as names go, isn’t it? Tom Brokaw made the name up and of course everyone loved it. What, you’re going to argue with your grandfather that he isn’t in the greatest generation? The generation ended when the war ended.
Baby Boomers. This is the agreed-upon generation that falls within DiPrete’s punctuated timeframe. It began when the Greatest Generation got home and started having sex with everyone; it ended when having sex with everyone was made easier with The Pill.
Generation X. George Masnick, of the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studiesputs this generation in the timeframe of 1965 to 1984, in part because it’s a neat 20-year period. He also calls it the “baby bust,” mocking “[p]undits on Madison Avenue and in the media” that call it Generation X. Ha ha, tough luck.
Generation Y. Masnick addresses this group, too, putting it “anywhere from the mid-1970s when the oldest were born to the mid-2000s when the youngest were.” But mostly Generation Y is a made-up generation when it became obvious that young kids didn’t really fit with the cool Generation X aesthetic but not enough of them had been born to make a new generation designation. NOTE:Generation Y is a fake, made-up thing. Do not worry about it.
Millennials. In October 2004, researchers Neil Howe and William Strauss calledMillennials “the next great generation,” which is funny. They define the group as “as those born in 1982 and approximately the 20 years thereafter.” In 2012, they affixed the end point as 2004.
TBD. But that means that kids born in the last 10 years lack a designation. Theyare not Millennials. Earlier this month, Pew Research asked people what the group should be called and offered some terrible ideas. In other words, this is the new Generation Y. We’ll figure out what they’re called in the future.
Here, we made a helpful chart.

There you have it. The experts say the media get to determine when generations happen, and we’re the media. We also get to say which generations are the worst, and the Millennials are the worst. But you already knew that.
Monthly Giving is Simple – How it Works
We support Ascension Center Church Org
and AlienContact.org.

• You choose the amount of your monthly donation.

• We use paypal. Email confirmation when charged..

• Each January, we will send you a statement of your 
total annual gifts (which can be used for tax 
purposes).

• You can change the amount of your monthly gift at 
any time, or cancel your participation in the 
ACO Team at any time.

Joining the ACO Team is simple and secure, 
and is an effective way to support AlienContact.org .

Unidentified Anamolous Phenomena (UAP) plays right into our our acronyms we use in the Alien ET UFO Community of Associations, Organizations, and Nor for Profit in the USA.
We have many organizations and various groups are teaming up for events and for social media marketing online.
Teams are forming that include authors, and creators who desire to work together. Some are a good fit and some are not. Some are due to age differences and values of work ethics. Even as volunteers in fellowship associations that are unincorporated in cyberspace.
TJ Morris dba ACIR, Agent-Consultant-Organizer- Founder-Director

In order to form a more perfect union establish this Constitution with Articles and By-laws to meet the standards of incorporation in the United States of America. We abide by all laws and uphold the constitution of the United States of America. We consider ourselves in a cooperative as a CO-OP and are independent business associations and members of our organizations as support and fellowship groups as one whole community online practicing skills.
Theresa J Morris is the agent for both the ACO and ACE.
We share ERA COP as our Files for major decisions on our agreements while forming our future in the present online. We share that we are authors, consultants, organizers, and share in radio shows to share our communication and speechcraft. We are co-creators and work to share our opinions, views, and ideas we use in synchronicity.
 Ascension Center Organization for Cyberspace Cultural Community who believe Alien Civilizations Exist! Archivists and Researchers who share as AUTHORS, Storytellers, and Role Playing with games both live and in archetypes based on the tarot. Past, present, and future role models. We are members and mentors who share life in cyberpsace and have an annual convention meet up group at the Mid-South Con in Memphis, Tennessee. We are based on the fact that “Alien Civilizations Exist!: ACE.
We share the ACE Metaphysical Institute for metaphysicians.- 

2016 – In March – April- May we extended our events to include the 1st International Science Global Pyramid Conference with Rev. Marta Thomas of Chicago, Illinois. We agreed to have her on our CosmosRadioOrg Radio Show and to promote all her choices for speakers at this annual event which promotes the “Pyramid Family Gathering of Researchers.” Bruce Cunningham, Marta Thomas, Radmilo Anicic, Dr. Robert J. Gilbert, and others were accepted as speakers.

Officers for the next three years were decided after the passing of our former President Thomas R. Morris on Dec. 2, 2015. He was the grandson of John Crystal Morris who lived to be a Kentucky Colonel at the age of 108 years and 9 months before his passing. Ascension Center Church Org was added as a name and website in honor of keeping the spirit alive of the “Christ Consciousness” of Ascension.

Spiritual and Education Awareness is still the main mission for our Ascension Center Education (ACE) and spreading the word that Alien Civilizations Exist (ACE) and Adults Continuing Education.

ACO is the acronym for Ascension Center Organization and Alien Contact Org. The Cooperative is of volunteers as Lightworkers and Truhseekers. The main Ascension Center Articles and By-laws was accepted in 1993 and adopted again in 2012 with the TJ Morris ET Radio Shows on http://blogttalkradio.com/TJMorrisETRadio and also known as http://blogtalkradio.com/CosmosRadioOrg.

Officers: voted 
ACO MAGAZINEevery 3 years.
Board of Directors:
Theresa J Morris
Janet Kira Lessin
Thomas Anthony Sinisi
Bill M. Tracer
Thomas Becker
Dr. Bruce Maccabee, Phd. Board of Advisers
Dr. Alexander (Sasha)  Philip Lessin, Ph.d. Board of Advisers
Dr. Robert J. Gilbert, Board of Advisers
Radmilo Anicic – Canada-New York

Alien Contact Org (ACO)~ Alien Cosmos Expos (ACE) ~ A Peer-Review-Journal~ ACO UFO CLUB~ TJ Morris ACIR
ACO CLUB – JOIN TODAY!
DONATE-SUPPORT HERE!
ALIEN COSMOS EXPOS USA
MEMBERS POSITIONS
PAYPAL ME TO HELP
TJ MORRIS RADIO MAG
THERESA J MORRIS, FOUNDER
TJ MORRIS ACIR
TJ MORRIS ET COSMOS RADIO
COSMOS RADIO ORG
ASCENSION PSYCHICS

Since World War I We began Keeping = 20 year increments as generations from birth until Age 20 Since adults begin legal age as 21 accepted after junior college or 2 years as skills minimum paid for.

Education for our generations in the world. We would like to continue our trade and commerce/
Information and Artificial Intelligence is here to stay.
Aerospace Advancements for our future deals with 2025-2044 –
We share 2025 as future of humankind.

2 years – Associates Junior College by Age 21 years is planned.

We now recognize that the latter generations may not plan on higher education for Bachelors however, for those that do plan on receiving a masters and doctor in philosophy this will require masters and doctors education in metaphysics.

1 ended 1918(World War I Generation) – 1903-1923
Greatest Generation – World War II-1924-1945(WWI Ended 1918)
Baby Boomer Generation – 1946- 1964
Generation X – 1965 -1984
Generation Y (Millenials) – 1985-2004
Generation (Information Age) 2005-2024
Alpha Generation (Singularity Intelligence) 2025-2044
Bravo Generation(Bravo -Class 1 Planet Space Age) 2045-2064
For more information:

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2014/03/here-is-when-each-generation-begins-and-ends-according-to-facts/359589/

“All this data exhaust inherently generates privacy concerns and the need for protecting that data,” says Maguire, adding that she’s buoyed by the progress being made on a variety of fronts to protect personal data. “We must have ownership and oversight of our data.”
The third big shift being made by the information generation – those growing up in the era of Internet ubiquity – is in the arena of augmented decision making.
“Tech leaders increasingly are saying that we’re moving to a world where employees with smart decision-support systems in the workplace,” says Maguire, citing the example of a doctor pulling from reams of research at the click of a mouse. “We’re not talking about job displacement by AI (artificial intelligence) robots. We’re talking about having workplace tools that let us do our jobs better.”
Examples of this approach include Hong Kong’s efficient subway system, which uses AI systems to run simulated train lines to determine the best possible timetable while saving the company nearly $1 million a year, she says.
The fourth coming shift is dubbed “multi-sensory communication,” and is perhaps best exemplified by one feature of Apple Watch. Using a built-in tech that can tap its user on the wrist with a burst of energy, Watch is capable of relaying wearers’ heartbeats from watch to watch. Maguire calls this just the tip of an iceberg of tech innovations whose mission is to save us from information overload.
“The next decade will find us receiving information in new ways, using new senses,” she says, citing Marriott Hotels’ Teleporter, a roving device that allows visitors to be whisked away to properties around the world thanks to the magic of Facebook-owned Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles.

USA TODAY
Experts: Wearable tech tests our privacy limits
“Some of this stuff might be clunky now, but early indications are that these breakthrough will become less contrived and more organic,” she says. “Soon we simply won’t be just taking things in through screens.”
The last shift circles back to the first. Under the heading “privacy-enhancing tech” are predictions of cryptographic breakthroughs that hopefully will deliver us from a reality where it seems every major outfit is being hacked on an almost daily basis.
Of all the shifts, however, this one clearly deserves the most attention. Without encrypted and secure data transfer, our digital lives will fast become an open book.
Says Maguire: “The question we need to keep asking is, simply, what is technology setting us up for over the longer term?”
To read more:http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/04/16/2025-tech-predictions-thrilling-and-scary-data-ubiquity-security-concerns/25740105/

PHILIP BUMP Wired
 MAR 25, 2014 
 U.S.
We can all agree that Millennials are the worst. But what is a Millennial? A fight between The New York Times and Slate inspired us to try and figure that out.
After the Times ran a column giving employers tips on how to deal with Millennials (for example, they need regular naps) (I didn’t read the article; that’s from my experience), Slate’s Amanda Hess pointed out that the examples theTimes used to demonstrate their points weren’t actually Millennials. Some of the people quoted in the article were as old as 37, which was considered elderly only 5,000 short years ago. I started by calling the Census Bureau. A representative called me back, without much information. “We do not define the different generations,” she told me. “The only generation we do define is Baby Boomers and that year bracket is from 1946 to 1964.”
Next, I spoke with Tom DiPrete, a sociology professor at Columbia University. And he agreed with the Census Bureau. “I think the boundaries end up getting drawn to some extent by the media,” DiPrete said, “and the extent to which people accept them or not varies by the generation.” DiPrete explained that there was a good sociological reason for identifying the Baby Boom as a discrete generation. It “had specific characteristics,” and occurred within an observable timeframe. World War II ended. You had the post-war rise in standard of living and the rise of the nuclear family. Then societal changes disrupted those patterns, and the generation, for academic purposes, was over. His main point: “History isn’t always so punctuated.”
I understood why Generation X, a generation defined by turmoil and uncertainty, would be poorly defined. But what about Millennials? Doesn’t their shared experience of the millennium transition and technology provide similar markers? “I actually haven’t seen efforts to document [generations] rigorously, and I would be somewhat skeptical that they can be documented rigorously.” DiPrete said. The things that have shaped Millennials — the rise of technology and social networks, for example — “affect people’s lives differently.”
“The media in particular wants definitions, identities,” DiPrete said. “I don’t know that the definitions are as strong or as widely shared across all the boundaries. … At the end I think it gets fuzzy.”
Well, yeah. We do want definitions. And if it’s the media that draws the boundaries, then allow us to do so definitively.
Your official demarcation of generational boundaries
We identified six different generations, and labeled their eras.
Greatest Generation. These are the people that fought and died in World War II for our freedom, which we appreciate. But it’s a little over-the-top as far as names go, isn’t it? Tom Brokaw made the name up and of course everyone loved it. What, you’re going to argue with your grandfather that he isn’t in the greatest generation? The generation ended when the war ended.
Baby Boomers. This is the agreed-upon generation that falls within DiPrete’s punctuated timeframe. It began when the Greatest Generation got home and started having sex with everyone; it ended when having sex with everyone was made easier with The Pill.
Generation X. George Masnick, of the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studiesputs this generation in the timeframe of 1965 to 1984, in part because it’s a neat 20-year period. He also calls it the “baby bust,” mocking “[p]undits on Madison Avenue and in the media” that call it Generation X. Ha ha, tough luck.
Generation Y. Masnick addresses this group, too, putting it “anywhere from the mid-1970s when the oldest were born to the mid-2000s when the youngest were.” But mostly Generation Y is a made-up generation when it became obvious that young kids didn’t really fit with the cool Generation X aesthetic but not enough of them had been born to make a new generation designation. NOTE:Generation Y is a fake, made-up thing. Do not worry about it.
Millennials. In October 2004, researchers Neil Howe and William Strauss calledMillennials “the next great generation,” which is funny. They define the group as “as those born in 1982 and approximately the 20 years thereafter.” In 2012, they affixed the end point as 2004.
TBD. But that means that kids born in the last 10 years lack a designation. Theyare not Millennials. Earlier this month, Pew Research asked people what the group should be called and offered some terrible ideas. In other words, this is the new Generation Y. We’ll figure out what they’re called in the future.
Here, we made a helpful chart.

There you have it. The experts say the media get to determine when generations happen, and we’re the media. We also get to say which generations are the worst, and the Millennials are the worst. But you already knew that.
Monthly Giving is Simple – How it Works
We support Ascension Center Church Org
and AlienContact.org.

• You choose the amount of your monthly donation.

• We use paypal. Email confirmation when charged..

• Each January, we will send you a statement of your 
total annual gifts (which can be used for tax 
purposes).

• You can change the amount of your monthly gift at 
any time, or cancel your participation in the 
ACO Team at any time.

Joining the ACO Team is simple and secure, 
and is an effective way to support AlienContact.org .

ACO 2016-2019

Radmilo Anicic Pyramid Explorations Blissful Health Coach
Radmilo Anicic
Pyramid Explorations
Blissful Health Coach
Dr. Robert J Gilbert
Dr. Robert J Gilbert
Rev. Marta Thomas
Rev. Marta Thomas
564597_139021342909204_171298056_n
Bruce Cunningham Explorier-Founder AMI
Bruce Cunningham
Explorier-Founder AMI

TJ Morris dba ACIR, Agent-Consultant-Organizer- Founder-Director
In order to form a more perfect union establish this Constitution with Articles and By-laws to meet the standards of incorporation in the United States of America. We abide by all laws and uphold the constitution of the United States of America. We consider ourselves in a cooperative as a CO-OP and are independent business associations and members of our organizations as support and fellowship groups as one whole community online practicing skills.
Theresa J Morris is the agent for both the ACO and ACE.
We share ERA COP as our Files for major decisions on our agreements while forming our future in the present online. We share that we are authors, consultants, organizers, and share in radio shows to share our communication and speechcraft. We are co-creators and work to share our opinions, views, and ideas we use in synchronicity.
 Ascension Center Organization for Cyberspace Cultural Community who believe Alien Civilizations Exist! Archivists and Researchers who share as AUTHORS, Storytellers, and Role Playing with games both live and in archetypes based on the tarot. Past, present, and future role models. We are members and mentors who share life in cyberpsace and have an annual convention meet up group at the Mid-South Con in Memphis, Tennessee. We are based on the fact that “Alien Civilizations Exist!: ACE.
We share the ACE Metaphysical Institute for metaphysicians.- 

2016 – In March – April- May we extended our events to include the 1st International Science Global Pyramid Conference with Rev. Marta Thomas of Chicago, Illinois. We agreed to have her on our CosmosRadioOrg Radio Show and to promote all her choices for speakers at this annual event which promotes the “Pyramid Family Gathering of Researchers.” Bruce Cunningham, Marta Thomas, Radmilo Anicic, Dr. Robert J. Gilbert, and others were accepted as speakers.

Officers for the next three years were decided after the passing of our former President Thomas R. Morris on Dec. 2, 2015. He was the grandson of John Crystal Morris who lived to be a Kentucky Colonel at the age of 108 years and 9 months before his passing. Ascension Center Church Org was added as a name and website in honor of keeping the spirit alive of the “Christ Consciousness” of Ascension.

Spiritual and Education Awareness is still the main mission for our Ascension Center Education (ACE) and spreading the word that Alien Civilizations Exist (ACE) and Adults Continuing Education.

ACO is the acronym for Ascension Center Organization and Alien Contact Org. The Cooperative is of volunteers as Lightworkers and Truhseekers. The main Ascension Center Articles and By-laws was accepted in 1993 and adopted again in 2012 with the TJ Morris ET Radio Shows on http://blogttalkradio.com/TJMorrisETRadio and also known as http://blogtalkradio.com/CosmosRadioOrg.

Officers: voted 
ACO MAGAZINEevery 3 years.
Board of Directors:
Theresa J Morris
Janet Kira Lessin
Thomas Anthony Sinisi
Bill M. Tracer
Thomas Becker
Dr. Bruce Maccabee, Phd. Board of Advisers
Dr. Alexander (Sasha)  Philip Lessin, Ph.d. Board of Advisers
Dr. Robert J. Gilbert, Board of Advisers
Radmilo Anicic – Canada-New York

Alien Contact Org (ACO)~ Alien Cosmos Expos (ACE) ~ A Peer-Review-Journal~ ACO UFO CLUB~ TJ Morris ACIR
ACO CLUB – JOIN TODAY!
DONATE-SUPPORT HERE!
ALIEN COSMOS EXPOS USA
MEMBERS POSITIONS
PAYPAL ME TO HELP
TJ MORRIS RADIO MAG
THERESA J MORRIS, FOUNDER
TJ MORRIS ACIR
TJ MORRIS ET COSMOS RADIO
COSMOS RADIO ORG
ASCENSION PSYCHICS

Theresa J Morris Ascension Age ERA COP Author Founder'-ACO Author Club Org
Theresa J Morris
Ascension Age ERA
COP Author Founder’-ACO Author Club Org
Agent-Consultant- Organizer Events PR
Agent-Consultant-
Organizer
Events PR
Join Global Pyramid Group on Radio Org and ERA COP
Join Global Pyramid Group on Radio Org
and ERA COP

Since World War I We began Keeping = 20 year increments as generations from birth until Age 20 Since adults begin legal age as 21 accepted after junior college or 2 years as skills minimum paid for.

ERA COP Journal ERA Cop Radio Shows Cosmo Radio Org
ERA COP Journal
ERA Cop Radio Shows
Cosmo Radio Org
MAGAZINES ONLINE TJ Morris ACIR American Culture International Relations
MAGAZINES ONLINE
TJ Morris ACIR
American Culture International Relations

Education for our generations in the world. We would like to continue our trade and commerce/
Information and Artifical Intelligence is here to stay.
Aerospace Advancements for our future deals with 2025-2044 –
We share 2025 asfuture of humankind.

2 years – Associates Junior College by Age 21 years is planned.

We now recognize that the latter generations may not plan on higher education for Bachelors however, for those that do plan on receiving a masters and doctor in philsophy this will require masters and doctors education in

1 ended 1918(World War I Generation) – 1903-1923
Greatest Generation – World War II-1924-1945(WWI Ended 1918)
Baby Boomer Generation – 1946- 1964
Generation X – 1965 -1984
Generation Y (Millenials) – 1985-2004
Generation (Information Age) 2005-2024
Alpha Generation (Singularity Intelligence) 2025-2044
Bravo Generation(Bravo -Class 1 Planet Space Age) 2045-2064
For more information:

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2014/03/here-is-when-each-generation-begins-and-ends-according-to-facts/359589/

“All this data exhaust inherently generates privacy concerns and the need for protecting that data,” says Maguire, adding that she’s buoyed by the progress being made on a variety of fronts to protect personal data. “We must have ownership and oversight of our data.”
The third big shift being made by the information generation – those growing up in the era of Internet ubiquity – is in the arena of augmented decision making.
“Tech leaders increasingly are saying that we’re moving to a world where employees with smart decision-support systems in the workplace,” says Maguire, citing the example of a doctor pulling from reams of research at the click of a mouse. “We’re not talking about job displacement by AI (artificial intelligence) robots. We’re talking about having workplace tools that let us do our jobs better.”
Examples of this approach include Hong Kong’s efficient subway system, which uses AI systems to run simulated train lines to determine the best possible timetable while saving the company nearly $1 million a year, she says.
The fourth coming shift is dubbed “multi-sensory communication,” and is perhaps best exemplified by one feature of Apple Watch. Using a built-in tech that can tap its user on the wrist with a burst of energy, Watch is capable of relaying wearers’ heartbeats from watch to watch. Maguire calls this just the tip of an iceberg of tech innovations whose mission is to save us from information overload.
“The next decade will find us receiving information in new ways, using new senses,” she says, citing Marriott Hotels’ Teleporter, a roving device that allows visitors to be whisked away to properties around the world thanks to the magic of Facebook-owned Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles.

USA TODAY
Experts: Wearable tech tests our privacy limits
“Some of this stuff might be clunky now, but early indications are that these breakthrough will become less contrived and more organic,” she says. “Soon we simply won’t be just taking things in through screens.”
The last shift circles back to the first. Under the heading “privacy-enhancing tech” are predictions of cryptographic breakthroughs that hopefully will deliver us from a reality where it seems every major outfit is being hacked on an almost daily basis.
Of all the shifts, however, this one clearly deserves the most attention. Without encrypted and secure data transfer, our digital lives will fast become an open book.
Says Maguire: “The question we need to keep asking is, simply, what is technology setting us up for over the longer term?”
To read more:http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/04/16/2025-tech-predictions-thrilling-and-scary-data-ubiquity-security-concerns/25740105/

PHILIP BUMP 
 MAR 25, 2014 
 U.S.
We can all agree that Millennials are the worst. But what is a Millennial? A fight between The New York Times and Slate inspired us to try and figure that out.
After the Times ran a column giving employers tips on how to deal with Millennials (for example, they need regular naps) (I didn’t read the article; that’s from my experience), Slate’s Amanda Hess pointed out that the examples theTimes used to demonstrate their points weren’t actually Millennials. Some of the people quoted in the article were as old as 37, which was considered elderly only 5,000 short years ago.
The age of employees of The Wire, the humble website you are currently reading, varies widely, meaning that we too have in the past wondered where the boundaries for the various generations were drawn. Is a 37-year-old who gets text-message condolences from her friends a Millennial by virtue of her behavior? Or is she some other generation, because she was born super long ago? (Sorry, 37-year-old Rebecca Soffer who is a friend of a friend of mine and who I met once! You’re not actually that old!) Since The Wire is committed to Broadening Human Understanding™, I decided to find out where generational boundaries are drawn.

I started by calling the Census Bureau. A representative called me back, without much information. “We do not define the different generations,” she told me. “The only generation we do define is Baby Boomers and that year bracket is from 1946 to 1964.”
Next, I spoke with Tom DiPrete, a sociology professor at Columbia University. And he agreed with the Census Bureau. “I think the boundaries end up getting drawn to some extent by the media,” DiPrete said, “and the extent to which people accept them or not varies by the generation.” DiPrete explained that there was a good sociological reason for identifying the Baby Boom as a discrete generation. It “had specific characteristics,” and occurred within an observable timeframe. World War II ended. You had the post-war rise in standard of living and the rise of the nuclear family. Then societal changes disrupted those patterns, and the generation, for academic purposes, was over. His main point: “History isn’t always so punctuated.”
I understood why Generation X, a generation defined by turmoil and uncertainty, would be poorly defined. But what about Millennials? Doesn’t their shared experience of the millennium transition and technology provide similar markers? “I actually haven’t seen efforts to document [generations] rigorously, and I would be somewhat skeptical that they can be documented rigorously.” DiPrete said. The things that have shaped Millennials — the rise of technology and social networks, for example — “affect people’s lives differently.”

“The media in particular wants definitions, identities,” DiPrete said. “I don’t know that the definitions are as strong or as widely shared across all the boundaries. … At the end I think it gets fuzzy.”
Well, yeah. We do want definitions. And if it’s the media that draws the boundaries, then allow us to do so definitively.
Your official demarcation of generational boundaries
We identified six different generations, and labeled their eras.
Greatest Generation. These are the people that fought and died in World War II for our freedom, which we appreciate. But it’s a little over-the-top as far as names go, isn’t it? Tom Brokaw made the name up and of course everyone loved it. What, you’re going to argue with your grandfather that he isn’t in the greatest generation? The generation ended when the war ended.
Baby Boomers. This is the agreed-upon generation that falls within DiPrete’s punctuated timeframe. It began when the Greatest Generation got home and started having sex with everyone; it ended when having sex with everyone was made easier with The Pill.
Generation X. George Masnick, of the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studiesputs this generation in the timeframe of 1965 to 1984, in part because it’s a neat 20-year period. He also calls it the “baby bust,” mocking “[p]undits on Madison Avenue and in the media” that call it Generation X. Ha ha, tough luck.
Generation Y. Masnick addresses this group, too, putting it “anywhere from the mid-1970s when the oldest were born to the mid-2000s when the youngest were.” But mostly Generation Y is a made-up generation when it became obvious that young kids didn’t really fit with the cool Generation X aesthetic but not enough of them had been born to make a new generation designation. NOTE:Generation Y is a fake, made-up thing. Do not worry about it.
Millennials. In October 2004, researchers Neil Howe and William Strauss calledMillennials “the next great generation,” which is funny. They define the group as “as those born in 1982 and approximately the 20 years thereafter.” In 2012, they affixed the end point as 2004.
TBD. But that means that kids born in the last 10 years lack a designation. Theyare not Millennials. Earlier this month, Pew Research asked people what the group should be called and offered some terrible ideas. In other words, this is the new Generation Y. We’ll figure out what they’re called in the future.
Here, we made a helpful chart.

There you have it. The experts say the media get to determine when generations happen, and we’re the media. We also get to say which generations are the worst, and the Millennials are the worst. But you already knew that.
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The experts say the media get to determine when generations happen, and we’re the media. We also get to say which generations are the worst, and the Millennials are the worst. But you already knew that.

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1 ended 1918(World War I Generation) – 1903-1923
Greatest Generation – World War II-1924-1945(WWI Ended 1918)
Baby Boomer Generation – 1946- 1964
Generation X – 1965 -1984
Generation Y (Millenials) – 1985-2004
Generation (Information Age) 2005-2024
Alpha Generation (Singularity Intelligence) 2025-2044
Bravo Generation(Bravo -Class 1 Planet Space Age) 2045-2064
For more information:

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2014/03/here-is-when-each-generation-begins-and-ends-according-to-facts/359589/

“All this data exhaust inherently generates privacy concerns and the need for protecting that data,” says Maguire, adding that she’s buoyed by the progress being made on a variety of fronts to protect personal data. “We must have ownership and oversight of our data.”
The third big shift being made by the information generation – those growing up in the era of Internet ubiquity – is in the arena of augmented decision making.
“Tech leaders increasingly are saying that we’re moving to a world where employees with smart decision-support systems in the workplace,” says Maguire, citing the example of a doctor pulling from reams of research at the click of a mouse. “We’re not talking about job displacement by AI (artificial intelligence) robots. We’re talking about having workplace tools that let us do our jobs better.”
Examples of this approach include Hong Kong’s efficient subway system, which uses AI systems to run simulated train lines to determine the best possible timetable while saving the company nearly $1 million a year, she says.
The fourth coming shift is dubbed “multi-sensory communication,” and is perhaps best exemplified by one feature of Apple Watch. Using a built-in tech that can tap its user on the wrist with a burst of energy, Watch is capable of relaying wearers’ heartbeats from watch to watch. Maguire calls this just the tip of an iceberg of tech innovations whose mission is to save us from information overload.
“The next decade will find us receiving information in new ways, using new senses,” she says, citing Marriott Hotels’ Teleporter, a roving device that allows visitors to be whisked away to properties around the world thanks to the magic of Facebook-owned Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles.

USA TODAY
Experts: Wearable tech tests our privacy limits
“Some of this stuff might be clunky now, but early indications are that these breakthrough will become less contrived and more organic,” she says. “Soon we simply won’t be just taking things in through screens.”
The last shift circles back to the first. Under the heading “privacy-enhancing tech” are predictions of cryptographic breakthroughs that hopefully will deliver us from a reality where it seems every major outfit is being hacked on an almost daily basis.
Of all the shifts, however, this one clearly deserves the most attention. Without encrypted and secure data transfer, our digital lives will fast become an open book.
Says Maguire: “The question we need to keep asking is, simply, what is technology setting us up for over the longer term?”
To read more:http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/04/16/2025-tech-predictions-thrilling-and-scary-data-ubiquity-security-concerns/25740105/

PHILIP BUMP 
 MAR 25, 2014 
 U.S.
We can all agree that Millennials are the worst. But what is a Millennial? A fight between The New York Times and Slate inspired us to try and figure that out.
After the Times ran a column giving employers tips on how to deal with Millennials (for example, they need regular naps) (I didn’t read the article; that’s from my experience), Slate’s Amanda Hess pointed out that the examples theTimes used to demonstrate their points weren’t actually Millennials. Some of the people quoted in the article were as old as 37, which was considered elderly only 5,000 short years ago.
The age of employees of The Wire, the humble website you are currently reading, varies widely, meaning that we too have in the past wondered where the boundaries for the various generations were drawn. Is a 37-year-old who gets text-message condolences from her friends a Millennial by virtue of her behavior? Or is she some other generation, because she was born super long ago? (Sorry, 37-year-old Rebecca Soffer who is a friend of a friend of mine and who I met once! You’re not actually that old!) Since The Wire is committed to Broadening Human Understanding™, I decided to find out where generational boundaries are drawn.

I started by calling the Census Bureau. A representative called me back, without much information. “We do not define the different generations,” she told me. “The only generation we do define is Baby Boomers and that year bracket is from 1946 to 1964.”
Next, I spoke with Tom DiPrete, a sociology professor at Columbia University. And he agreed with the Census Bureau. “I think the boundaries end up getting drawn to some extent by the media,” DiPrete said, “and the extent to which people accept them or not varies by the generation.” DiPrete explained that there was a good sociological reason for identifying the Baby Boom as a discrete generation. It “had specific characteristics,” and occurred within an observable timeframe. World War II ended. You had the post-war rise in standard of living and the rise of the nuclear family. Then societal changes disrupted those patterns, and the generation, for academic purposes, was over. His main point: “History isn’t always so punctuated.”
I understood why Generation X, a generation defined by turmoil and uncertainty, would be poorly defined. But what about Millennials? Doesn’t their shared experience of the millennium transition and technology provide similar markers? “I actually haven’t seen efforts to document [generations] rigorously, and I would be somewhat skeptical that they can be documented rigorously.” DiPrete said. The things that have shaped Millennials — the rise of technology and social networks, for example — “affect people’s lives differently.”

“The media in particular wants definitions, identities,” DiPrete said. “I don’t know that the definitions are as strong or as widely shared across all the boundaries. … At the end I think it gets fuzzy.”
Well, yeah. We do want definitions. And if it’s the media that draws the boundaries, then allow us to do so definitively.
Your official demarcation of generational boundaries
We identified six different generations, and labeled their eras.
Greatest Generation. These are the people that fought and died in World War II for our freedom, which we appreciate. But it’s a little over-the-top as far as names go, isn’t it? Tom Brokaw made the name up and of course everyone loved it. What, you’re going to argue with your grandfather that he isn’t in the greatest generation? The generation ended when the war ended.
Baby Boomers. This is the agreed-upon generation that falls within DiPrete’s punctuated timeframe. It began when the Greatest Generation got home and started having sex with everyone; it ended when having sex with everyone was made easier with The Pill.
Generation X. George Masnick, of the Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studiesputs this generation in the timeframe of 1965 to 1984, in part because it’s a neat 20-year period. He also calls it the “baby bust,” mocking “[p]undits on Madison Avenue and in the media” that call it Generation X. Ha ha, tough luck.
Generation Y. Masnick addresses this group, too, putting it “anywhere from the mid-1970s when the oldest were born to the mid-2000s when the youngest were.” But mostly Generation Y is a made-up generation when it became obvious that young kids didn’t really fit with the cool Generation X aesthetic but not enough of them had been born to make a new generation designation. NOTE:Generation Y is a fake, made-up thing. Do not worry about it.
Millennials. In October 2004, researchers Neil Howe and William Strauss calledMillennials “the next great generation,” which is funny. They define the group as “as those born in 1982 and approximately the 20 years thereafter.” In 2012, they affixed the end point as 2004.
TBD. But that means that kids born in the last 10 years lack a designation. Theyare not Millennials. Earlier this month, Pew Research asked people what the group should be called and offered some terrible ideas. In other words, this is the new Generation Y. We’ll figure out what they’re called in the future.
Here, we made a helpful chart.

There you have it. The experts say the media get to determine when generations happen, and we’re the media. We also get to say which generations are the worst, and the Millennials are the worst. But you already knew that.

Semantics on Planet Earth

ERA COP Radio
What is Semantics?
Richmond H. Thomason
Version 1 prepared: December 1, 1996
Version 2 (minor revisions): March 27, 2012
Copyright, Richmond H. Thomason, 1996
Comments Invited: Send Comments to rthomaso@umich.edu

ERA Cop Journal eracop.com Global Pyramid Group
ERA Cop Journal
eracop.com
Global Pyramid Group

Explanation: This document is an attempt to make an arcane and not very well understood area of inquiry intelligible to someone who knows no logic or linguistics. It was originally written for an encyclopedia that wanted something accessible even to a pre-high-school audience. But it doesn’t appear in any encyclopedia, because I wasn’t willing to write something to the editors’ specifications, and they weren’t willing to change their specifications. This episode is yet another example of how bad a job semanticists have done of making even well-informed laymen aware of what the issues are in the field.
Semantics is the study of the meaning of linguistic expressions. The language can be a natural language, such as English or Navajo, or an artificial language, like a computer programming language. Meaning in natural languages is mainly studied by linguists. In fact, semantics is one of the main branches of contemporary linguistics. Theoretical computer scientists and logicians think about artificial languages. In some areas of computer science, these divisions are crossed. In machine translation, for instance, computer scientists may want to relate natural language texts to abstract representations of their meanings; to do this, they have to design artificial languages for representing meanings.

There are strong connections to philosophy. Earlier in this century, much work in semantics was done by philosophers, and some important work is still done by philosophers.

Anyone who speaks a language has a truly amazing capacity to reason about the meanings of texts. Take, for instance, the sentence

(S) I can’t untie that knot with one hand.
Even though you have probably never seen this sentence, you can easily see things like the following:

The sentence is about the abilities of whoever spoke or wrote it. (Call this person the speaker.)
It’s also about a knot, maybe one that the speaker is pointing at.
The sentence denies that the speaker has a certain ability. (This is the contribution of the word ‘can’t’.)
Untying is a way of making something not tied.
The sentence doesn’t mean that the knot has one hand; it has to do with how many hands are used to do the untying.
The meaning of a sentence is not just an unordered heap of the meanings of its words. If that were true, then ‘Cowboys ride horses’ and ‘Horses ride cowboys’ would mean the same thing. So we need to think about arrangements of meanings.

Here is an arrangement that seems to bring out the relationships of the meanings in sentence (S).

Not [ I [ Able [ [ [Make [Not [Tied]]] [That knot ] ] [With One Hand] ] ] ]

The unit [Make [Not [Tied]] here corresponds to the act of untying; it contains a subunit corresponding to the state of being untied. Larger units correspond to the act of untying-that-knot and to the act to-untie-that-knot-with-one-hand. Then this act combines with Able to make a larger unit, corresponding to the state of being-able-to-untie-that-knot-with-one-hand. This unit combines with I to make the thought that I have this state — that is, the thought that I-am-able-to-untie-that-knot-with-one-hand. Finally, this combines with Not and we get the denial of that thought.

This idea that meaningful units combine systematically to form larger meaningful units, and understanding sentences is a way of working out these combinations, has probably been the most important theme in contemporary semantics.

Linguists who study semantics look for general rules that bring out the relationship between form, which is the observed arrangement of words in sentences and meaning. This is interesting and challenging, because these relationships are so complex.

A semantic rule for English might say that a simple sentence involving the word ‘can’t’ always corresponds to a meaning arrangement like

Not [ Able … ],

but never to one like

Able [ Not … ].

For instance, ‘I can’t dance’ means that I’m unable to dance; it doesn’t mean that I’m able not to dance.

To assign meanings to the sentences of a language, you need to know what they are. It is the job of another area of linguistics, called syntax, to answer this question, by providing rules that show how sentences and other expressions are built up out of smaller parts, and eventually out of words. The meaning of a sentence depends not only on the words it contains, but on its syntactic makeup: the sentence

(S) That can hurt you,
for instance, is ambiguous — it has two distinct meanings. These correspond to two distinct syntactic structures. In one structure ‘That’ is the subject and ‘can’ is an auxiliary verb (meaning “able”), and in the other ‘That can’ is the subject and ‘can’ is a noun (indicating a sort of container).

Because the meaning of a sentence depends so closely on its syntactic structure, linguists have given a lot of thought to the relations between syntactic structure and meaning; in fact, evidence about ambiguity is one way of testing ideas about syntactic structure.

You would expect an expert in semantics to know a lot about what meanings are. But linguists haven’t directly answered this question very successfully. This may seem like bad news for semantics, but it is actually not that uncommon for the basic concepts of a successful science to remain problematic: a physicist will probably have trouble telling you what time is. The nature of meaning, and the nature of time, are foundational questions that are debated by philosophers.

We can simplify the problem a little by saying that, whatever meanings are, we are interested in literal meaning. Often, much more than the meaning of a sentence is conveyed when someone uses it. Suppose that Carol says ‘I have to study’ in answer to ‘Can you go to the movies tonight?’. She means that she has to study that night, and that this is a reason why she can’t go to the movies. But the sentence she used literally means only that she has to study. Nonliteral meanings are studied in pragmatics, an area of linguistics that deals with discourse and contextual effects.

But what is a literal meaning? There are four sorts of answers: (1) you can dodge the question, or (2) appeal to usage, or (3) appeal to psychology, or (4) treat meanings as real objects.

(1) The first idea would involve trying to reconstruct semantics so that it can be done without actually referring to meanings. It turns out to be hard to do this — at least, if you want a theory that does what linguistic semanticists would like a theory to do. But the idea was popular earlier in the twentieth century, especially in the 1940s and 1950s, and has been revived several times since then, because many philosophers would prefer to do without meanings if at all possible. But these attempts tend to ignore the linguistic requirements, and for various technical reasons have not been very successful.

(2) When an English speaker says ‘It’s raining’ and a French speaker says ‘Il pleut’ you can say that there is a common pattern of usage here. But no one really knows how to characterize what the two utterances have in common without somehow invoking a common meaning. (In this case, the meaning that it’s raining.) So this idea doesn’t seem to really explain what meanings are.

(3) Here, you would try to explain meanings as ideas. This is an old idea, and is still popular; nowadays, it takes the form of developing an artificial language that is supposed to capture the “inner cognitive representations” of an ideal thinking and speaking agent. The problem with this approach is that the methods of contemporary psychology don’t provide much help in telling us in general what these inner representations are like. This idea doesn’t seem yet to lead to a methodology that can produce a workable semantic theory.

(4) If you say that the meaning of ‘Mars’ is a certain planet, at least you have a meaning relation that you can come to grips with. There is the word ‘Mars’ on the one hand, and on the other hand there is this big ball of matter circling around the sun. This clarity is good, but it is hard to see how you could cover all of language this way. It doesn’t help us very much in saying what sentences mean, for instance. And what about the other meaning of ‘Mars’? Do we have to believe in the Roman god to say that ‘Mars’ is meaningful? And what about ‘the largest number’?

The approach that most semanticists endorse is a combination of (1) and (4). Using techniques similar to those used by mathematicians, you can build up a complex universe of abstract objects that can serve as meanings (or denotations) of various sorts of linguistic expressions. Since sentences can be either true or false, the meanings of sentences usually involve the two truth values true and false. You can make up artificial languages for talking about these objects; some semanticists claim that these languages can be used to capture inner cognitive representations. If so, this would also incorporate elements of (3), the psychological approach to meanings. Finally, by restricting your attention to selected parts of natural language, you can often avoid hard questions about what meanings in general are. This is why this approach to some extent dodges the general question of what meanings are. The hope would be, however, that as more linguistic constructions are covered, better and more adequate representations of meaning would emerge.

Though “truth values” may seem artificial as components of meaning, they are very handy in talking about the meaning of things like negation; the semantic rule for negative sentences says that their meanings are like that of the corresponding positive sentences, except that the truth value is switched, false for true and true for false. ‘It isn’t raining’ is true if ‘It is raining’ is false, and false if ‘It is raining’ is true.

Truth values also provide a connection to validity and to valid reasoning. (It is valid to infer a sentence S2 from S1 in case S1 couldn’t possibly be true when S2 is false.) This interest in valid reasoning provides a strong connection to work in the semantics of artificial languages, since these languages are usually designed with some reasoning task in mind. Logical languages are designed to model theoretical reasoning such as mathematical proofs, while computer languages are intended to model a variety of general and special purpose reasoning tasks. Validity is useful in working with proofs because it gives us a criterion for correctness. It is useful in much the same way with computer programs, where it can sometimes be used to either prove a program correct, or (if the proof fails) to discover flaws in programs.

These ideas (which really come from logic) have proved to be very powerful in providing a theory of how the meanings of natural-language sentences depend on the meanings of the words they contain and their syntactic structure. Over the last forty years or so, there has been a lot of progress in working this out, not only for English, but for a wide variety of languages. This is made much easier by the fact that human languages are very similarin the kinds of rules that are needed for projecting meanings from words to sentences; they mainly differ in their words, and in the details of their syntactic rules.

Recently, there has been more interest in lexical semantics — that is, in the semantics of words. Lexical semantics is not so much a matter of trying to write an “ideal dictionary”. (Dictionaries contain a lot of useful information, but don’t really provide a theory of meaning or good representations of meanings.) Rather, lexical semantics is concerned with systematic relations in the meanings of words, and in recurring patterns among different meanings of the same word. It is no accident, for instance, that you can say ‘Sam ate a grape’ and ‘Sam ate’, the former saying what Sam ate and the latter merely saying that Sam ate something. This same pattern occurs with many verbs.

Logic is a help in lexical semantics, but lexical semantics is full of cases in which meanings depend subtly on context, and there are exceptions to many generalizations. (To undermine something is to mine under it; but to understand something is not to stand under it.) So logic doesn’t carry us as far here as it seems to carry us in the semantics of sentences.

Natural-language semantics is important in trying to make computers better able to deal directly with human languages. In one typical application, there is a program people need to use. Running the program requires using an artificial language (usually, a special-purpose command language or query-language) that tells the computer how to do some useful reasoning or question-answering task. But it is frustrating and time-consuming to teach this language to everyone who may want to interact with the program. So it is often worthwhile to write a second program, a natural language interface, that mediates between simple commands in a human language and the artificial language that the computer understands. Here, there is certainly no confusion about what a meaning is; the meanings you want to attach to natural language commands are the corresponding expressions of the programming language that the machine understands. Many computer scientists believe that natural language semantics is useful in designing programs of this sort. But it is only part of the picture. It turns out that most English sentences are ambiguous to a depressing extent. (If a sentence has just five words, and each of these words has four meanings, this alone gives potentially 1,024 possible combined meanings.) Generally, only a few of these potential meanings will be at all plausible. People are very good at focusing on these plausible meanings, without being swamped by the unintended meanings. But this takes common sense, and at present we do not have a very good idea of how to get computers to imitate this sort of common sense. Researchers in the area of computer science known as Artificial Intelligence are working on that. Meanwhile, in building natural-language interfaces, you can exploit the fact that a specific application (like retrieving answers from a database) constrains the things that a user is likely to say. Using this, and other clever techniques, it is possible to build special purpose natural-language interfaces that perform remarkably well, even though we are still a long way from figuring out how to get computers to do general-purpose natural-language understanding.

Semantics probably won’t help you find out the meaning of a word you don’t understand, though it does have a lot to say about the patterns of meaningfulness that you find in words. It certainly can’t help you understand the meaning of one of Shakespeare’s sonnets, since poetic meaning is so different from literal meaning. But as we learn more about semantics, we are finding out a lot about how the world’s languages match forms to meanings. And in doing that, we are learning a lot about ourselves and how we think, as well as acquiring knowledge that is useful in many different fields and applications. Source:http://web.eecs.umich.edu/~rthomaso/documents/general/what-is-semantics.html
conference-vertical

Theresa J Morris TJ Morris Radio CosmosRadioOrg
Theresa J Morris
TJ Morris Radio
CosmosRadioOrg

Ascension Cosmos Internet Radio (ACIR)

http://blogtalkradio.com/cosmosradioorgTJ Morris dba ACIR

ERA COP JOURNAL
ERA COP JOURNAL

Copyright all International Rights Reserved.

Ascension Cosmos Internet Radio also known as ACIR

shares the Authors Club Organization as ACO

and Ascension Center Organization as ACO.

A Spiritual Trade Association of various friends

of Theresa Janette Thurmond Morris also known as Theresa J Morris.

Theresa is an author, speaker, and radio host.

She also is a Life Coach and assists many sole owners and small businesses.

Concentration of her time has shifted though time and therefore she has created

the clubs with various niche genres.

Her book “How to Social Network Metaphysics”

ACO Social Club by Theresa J Morris was written for her event planner friends.

 

Now in 2016, Theresa J Morris is about organizing her friends into the topics they

enjoy discussing on her RADIO SHOWS and her PANEL DISCUSSIONS weekly.

  • Cosmos Radio Org
  • “We share art, culture,
  • education, science, technology,
  • history, folklife, spirituality, paranormal”
  • Ascension Cosmos International Radio (ACIR) Associates
  • TJ Morris dba ACIR owns TJ Morris Media.

ACIR Ascension Cosmos Internet Radio

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Global Pyramid Network Discussion with Theresa J Morris and Bree Houk, working together to spread the word about the first international, scientific Global Pyramid Conference coming up May 13th-15th near Chicago, IL at a beautiful venue, the Renaissance Chicago North Shore Hotel. Tonight TJ and Bree are beginning a weekly show with those of you who are researching the power of pyramids. We welcome Bree’s friend Patrick Giles tonight, an independent Egyptologist and author of a book he’s selling at the conference, called Rainwater: An Answer to the Pyramids. He’s joining us to share details of his last ten years of research regarding hieroglyphics, studying excavation, reports and how he’s building working models of pyramid complexes to prove his theory that a key part of pyramids in ancient civilizations was harvesting and purifying rainwater into drinking water.
Register for the Global Pyramid Conference at www.globalpyramidconference.eventbrite.com
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ERA COP JOURNAL
ERA COP JOURNAL

Marta Thomas, Founder Global Pyramid Conference

Rev. Marta Thomas, Conference Organizer

Reverend Marta Thomas

Originally from New York City, Marta owned her own dance studios and spent 18 years as a professional folkloric dancer. She specialized in the middle and near eastern dancing as well as Greek folk dance. Earlier in her career and through her dancing background, Marta and several other dancers were invited by the famous Mahmoud Reda, head of the Egyptian folkloric troupe, to tour Egypt. This gave Marta exposure to Egyptian culture early in her career, and so began her interest in pyramids.

Rev. Marta Thomas has been coordinating transformative journeys to sacred sites throughout the world for more than two decades. She is an event planner, spiritual counselor, Mayan energy practitioner, certified akashic records practitioner and sacred site essence maker. She is a member of the board of directors of the Sacred Site Foundation of South Africa.

To contact Rev. Marta Thomas, visit our Contact page, or emailinfo@globalpyramidconference.com.

TJ Morris ET Radio division of TJ Morris Radio Network, ACIR & Cosmos Radio Org-AlienContact.US, Alien Contact.org- TJ Morris Media